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to reform the economy and government spending soon, the u.s. could find itself in the same terrible economic situation as many european countries do today. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> thank you john for your very kind introduction and the invitation to speak at the heritage foundation today. it's a great privilege to be here. i have always been a great admirer of heritage and the council and in many cases the friendship of many people here at heritage for a very long time i have also admired the way that heritage works across policy areas so that you really do here and integrated message. not least among which i think is the intention of the heritage foundation to the power of culture, by which i mean people believe ideas, habits and expectations in the way that these achieve some form of institutional expression. this issue of culture and how it relates to the economy is at the heart of my book, "becoming europe" because at one level becoming europe is certainly about what has happened in europe and why it is now regarded as the sick man of the global economy. my book is also a
more time to gauge shinzo abe's rating policies. s&p says recent policies could reflat japan's economy. but the government's books will continue to be weighed down by heavy debt. that's even if plans go ahead to raise a sales tax. there's a one in three chance of a downgrade this fiscal year. this is as the japanese prime minister shinzo abe says he will consider changing the bank's mandate. he didn't comment on current policy. all this as investors determine who will become the bank of japan's next governor. front runners for the post include former bank of japan deputy governor and the head of the asian development bank harikahiko tura. >> we did catch up with taro at a meeting this weekend in moscow. the next boj governor was covered, but the first question, whether mr. aso thought the g-20 communique was an endorsement of japan's domestic stimulus plan. >> japan has repeatedly tried to explain that japanese policies are taken to overcome deflation and by all means, these are measures to overcome deflation as well as the recession. that's what is being said in the second paragraph o
. up next, samuel graveyard use of our elected leaders of find the courage to reform the economy and government spending soon the u.s. could find itself in the same terrible economic situation as many european countries to. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> thank you for your introduction. it's a great privilege to be here. inviting the it council, in many cases the of many people here and heritage for very long time. and also admired the way that heritage works across policy areas so that you really do here and integrated message. not least among which, i think, is the attention of the heritage foundation to the power of culture, by which i mean people of beliefs, ideas, habits, expectations, and the way that these achieve some form of institutional expression. >> on this issue of culture and how it relates to the economy, the heart of my book, becoming europe. because the -- becoming europe is certainly about what has happened to your and why it is now regarded as the sick man of the global economy. but my book is also about how some of these cultural and economic trends
is not falling. the lower spending and limited government sequester will help grow the economy not harm it. and guess what today? president obama actually dialed up republican leaders john boehner and mitch mcconnell to talk about the sequester. this is good. it's called communication. we'll have a full report coming up from our man in washington robert costa. remember how we told the other night about how federal workers are still getting pay raises despite a so-called pay freeze? it turns out federal worker pensions are facing huge unfunded liabilities that could bankrupt them and force a new taxpayer bailout. but on the whole, folks, have no fear, america. help is on the way. this is "the kudlow report" and it starts right now. >>> all right. first up tonight the sky is not falling. even the president's own press secretary backed up president obama's sequester threat of mass layoffs. take a listen to jay carney. >> we agree with the consensus estimates here again from private outside economic firms from the congressional budget office that say we would lose, the country would lose up to
in the economy. still to come, the hunt for the hot idea. why venture capitalists are ramping up the search for the next big thing. that's later. but first, why farmers are bracing for higher expenses in 2013. that's next with bill moller. some quiet but very important changes are taking place down on the farm these days. they're prompted by the sky-high land prices that we have seen for the past few years, but also by new technologies and greater efficiencies. these changes are outlined in a report from the federal reserve bank of chicago. david oppedahl is the business economist who compiled the data. why don't you first talk, david, in general terms about these changes and trends? > > agriculture is seeing a lot of activity in the last few years as some of the commodity prices have gone up a lot and you see corn and soybean growing in terms of the ability to grow, but then also as the prices have been higher, the yields are higher in general, but then this last year was a drought year, so that kind of set some momentum back. but overall, the land values have been rising, the efficiencies
leader but brazil is one of the most important emerging economies for the whole global economy it's one of as we call them the bricks the emerging economies that has the chance to structure how the economy is going to look going forward. when you think about the countries but obviously the united states when you think about the countries along the pacific rim of latin america they make connect more to the economy of asia. i was always struck when i would go to something called the summit of the americas which is about latin america and the caribbean and we would have these discussions and travis would take off and everybody would sort of what ever. but then almost a week or two weeks later we would go to the asia pacific economic council. there it is the pacific rim countries of chellie and the pacific rim all the way to canada and all the way out through japan and china and korea and the conversation was completely different. was about global trade and freeing trade. and i actually always thought that in that sense the country had more in common with their asian counterparts than their
for the economy following a tough recession. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: joe davis joins us now, he's chief economist at vanguard, the giant mutual fund company. >> susie: joe, nice to have you with us on this important day. let me start by asking you, do you think the fed is taking on too much risk? >> i think there is an argument that can be made. we've had a concern for more than a year that there are both costs as well as benefits with respect to very aggressive monetary policy. and just some of the behavior we've seen in the financial markets. i know the report talked about excessive risk-taking. so i've had a concern that those costs associated with monetary policy may not have been given the sort of credence they should have been. so a positive development, in my mind, to today's minutes it was that federal reserve policy-makers were more aggressively talking about both the pros and cons wreaptwith respect to aggressive monetary policy. >> susie: one thing we've been hearing repeatedly from the federal reserve is they're not going to make any change in this policy, raisin
and dedication have not yet been rewarded. our economy is adding jobs -- but too many people still can't find full-time employment. corporate profits have rocketed to all-time highs -- but for more than a decade, wages and incomes have barely budged. task,our generation's then, to reignite the true engine of america's economic growth -- a rising, thriving middle class. [laughter] --[applause] it is our unfinished task to restore the basic bargain that built this country -- the idea that if you work hard and meet your responsibilities, you can get ahead, no matter where you come from, what you look like, or who you love. it is our unfinished task to make sure that this government works on behalf of the many, and not just the few, that it encourages free enterprise, rewards individual initiative, and opens the doors of opportunity to every child across this great nation. [applause] the american people don't expect government to solve every problem. they don't expect those of us in this chamber to agree on every issue. but they do expect us to put the nation's interests before party. [applause]
in the local economy by my parts. every person who works on my product is going to raise the price of my product. every hand that touches the unit that i sell, a certain percentage of the company buys this products. every time i go to a vendor to get a part, my costs will increase. my competitor build a similar part for almost a third of what i build a mine. you will take away the factory workers who manufacture my parts. this is all usa jobs. lower the price of gas. back to two bucks a gallon and you won't have to worry about the minimum wage. host: how would an economist pre-minimum wage respond to that caller? guest: you are raising the cost of that worker to that business. that worker will have more money to spend. you can make more profits. you can pass the cost to people who are buying your goods by raising prices. raising the minimum wage has an effect on the economy. the question -- if there is a chance it would raise unemployment or perhaps put a business in the red. host: michelle, tacoma, washington. caller: i just realized our state is one of the higher states with minimum w
the sequestered because it is a wholly unnecessary will run the economy if it were to take place. >> except there were others in the president's party like former democratic national committee chairman howard dean suggesting the president should let the sequester happen to slice the pentagon's budget. telling the huffington post, i am in favor of the sequestered. it is tough on things that i care about a lot, but the fact of the matter is, you are not going to get another chance to cut the defense budget in the way that it needs to be cut. white house officials disagree. as does the outgoing defense secretary leon panetta warned such deep cuts could leave america with as second-rate military. lou: you will remember republicans were furious before the election and the white house was not complying with the warrant act which is a law that basically says employers need to warn employees about upcoming furloughs. the white house pushed back on all of that. now they are releasing those for loan notices. remember, people the 30-60 days in some cases on notices, which means these furloughs will ta
economy on an irreversible, downward path. we will hear about the past consequences of the impending cuts. i do not doubt that they will be painful to bear. if there is a way to mitigate the pain,i'm open to discussion. i believe it is important to emphasize that the sequester of whatever temporary solution we have made is just a precursor to the main event. thank you. >> thank you, senator shelby. we will go to the panel. i am going to explain how this is going to work. we would have begin with omb and wrap up with national security. in the interest of time and efficacy, we will have one panel and be able to ask questions where we can get cross communication going. we will start with you and then secretary donovan and secretary napolitano. we will go to questions and alternating on both sides of the aisle. right off with senator shelby and myself. you are representing omb. their obligations with the presidential responsibility. go ahead and give us the details of omb. i will not introduce everyone. we will keep it going. >> thank you. members of the committee, good morning. i'm here to d
that there is an average wage that is probably twice the national average. they have high leverage in the economy. there is going to be an unintended consequence, unfortunately, if there is not a deal made in 11 days. ashley: would you agree that defense spending needs to be reformed? it may be the wrong way to do it, but it seems to be the only way. >> the suddenness. in the past, abbott there -- in the past, there was a planned slowdown of an amount of what we are facing here. we have already taken a 12% cut for defense contractors and they are looking at another seven-12% again. ashley: how much does this compromise national security? >> well, clearly, one of the ways that will be cut in and unplanned fashion is to stop paying for discretionary things like language interpreters and servicers, as well as, maintenance and operations. that means we will not be able to deploy our forces overseas. whether it be for military purposes or expeditionary purposes for humanitarian aid. ashley: tom, quickly, they are supposed to give 60 day notices. if these cuts go into effect in 11 days, that will not h
are going to talk about silicon valley and the bay area innovation to the economy today. as you look at the panel, talking about the silicon valley, we have the mayor of san francisco. it will come into perspective, that when you have a giant like ibm anchor here in the valley, you are seeing in between companies like google and apple and facebook with incredible growth. in san francisco, mayor lee has welcomed to the fold in twitter, zynga, companies that are into cloud computing, hiring lots of people that not only want to live and work in the valley but recognize san francisco as being part of the valley. we are, indeed, fortunate, from san jose to san francisco, to be part of the innovation economy. we are finally seeing once again california's innovation is leading us out of the last three years of recession. i do not know about you but i am pretty tired of the recession. i made a statement several years ago that it was about time for an adjustment to the economy, things were too expensive, overheated. two years after that, i regretted making that comment. it was great to hear j
state of the union address, our top priority should be doing everything we can to grow the economy and create good jobs. that is our top priority and it drives every decision we make and it has to drive the decisions that congress and everybody in washington makes over the next several years. that is why it is so troubling that 10 days from now congress might allow a series of automatic, severe budget cuts to take place that will do the exact opposite. it will not help the economy. it will not create jobs. it will visit hardship on a lot of people. here is what is at stake. over the last few years, both parties have worked together to reduce our deficit i more than $2.5 trillion. more than two thirds of that was through some really tough spending cuts. the rest of it was through raising taxes, tax rates on the wealthiest 1% of americans. together, when you take the spending cuts and increased tax rates on the top 1%, it puts us halfway to the goal of four dollars trillion -- $4 trillion in deficit reduction. thomas say we needed to stabilize finances. -- economists say we need it.
that massive layoffs could cripple their economies. >> we don't need to wait to see the white in the eyes before we start responding because of the potential that we see. this challenge is real and real right now. >> reporter: well, with the deadline still nine days away, there's still a lot of posturing, and there's no sign that anyone's trying to make a deal. administration tells us that there are no secret talks or negotiations under way. the reason for that, of course, the obama administration thinks it's winning this debate and republican pressure will force republicans to give in. charlie, gayle? >> thanks. >>> cbs political correspondent john dickerson. good morning, john. >> good morning, charlie. >> put this for us in terms of what we're talking about and what we're not talking about. >> it's a good point. step back here. what we're not talking about in this sequester is the actual long-term drivers of this deficit problem so as people look at the fight, which is the 900th chap tur in the con stangt fights of the budget, what's happening is the debate about dumb cuts to a portion
for the ratings agencies, tomorrow they come for the banks, and that's the last thing our economy needs. a gallup poll found that consumer confidence in banks is already at an all-time low. that includes the 1930's, when bankers lowered confidence by occasionally landing on consumers. [laughter] and i believe that an investigation will just make things worse. i don't think the banks are in any financial position to reveal what financial position they're in. [laughter] take wells fargo. their recent annual report said that the bank's value is partly based on, quote, "significant assumptions not observable in the market." [laughter] that means the value of the largest capitalized bank in the united states defies observation. [laughter] the human mind cannot perceive it. we dare not look upon it. [laughter] remember what happened to the accountants who opened lehman brothers' books. [laughter] point is, i believe when it comes to our economy, there are things we just shouldn't know. here to know them at me is financial writer and washington bureau chief of the "new york times," david leonhardt. dave
this year, we're on track to take what, 60, 70 billion dollars out of the economy. question, why is this happening? former shell oil president john hofmeister, 10:45 this morning. listen to this, not only has colorado legalized recreational use of marijuana, he wants to use pot as a tourist draw, a tourist attraction, if you're over 21, feel free to smoke up. forget amsterdam, hop a flight to denver and light up a joint. we'll have more on this at the top of the hour, including how this could be a boom for lawyers. and i bet a lot of people will try to bring pot home from colorado not allowed and a defense attorney for you, all right. let's get back home, shall we? and so far, a tranquil america, we are 128 points away from the all time high this is, and up next, we will ask a trader if investors really care about spending cuts, sequester, do they care the at all. the opening bell next. [ male announcer] surprise -- you're having triplets. [ babies crying ] surprise -- your house was built on an ancient burial ground. [ ghosts moaning ] surprise -- your car needs a new transmissi
a question on everyone's mind -- how do we get the economy to grow from here? no one knows better than the leaders of corporate america. joining on set this morning, 32 adviser ceo robert wolfe. we'll have hanes celestial ceo irwin simon. and the kraft group president, jonathan kraft. >>> on the lighter side of things, spring is around the corner. that must meantime for baseball. white sox vice president ken williams will join us to talk business on and off the diamond coming up at 8:40 eastern time. >>> an interesting mix of topics in rotation today. first, let's get over to andrew with the top headlines. >> thanks. >>> boeing reportedly found a way to fix battery problems with its grounded 787. here's what's happening. involves increasing the space between cells in the battery. a source tells reuters the gaps between the cells were why there was overheating. we'll talk about that in a bit. >>> in other news on boeing, the company's engineers are split on a contract. the largest professional group approved the planemaker's latest contract offer. but members of a smaller technical unio
humira, to help relieve your pain and stop further joint damage. >>> the overall effect on the economy is slow down the recovery. not only end up being direct job loss but because the economy is softer it means we won't be driving down unemployment as quickly as we should. >> are you willing to see a bunch of first responders lose their jobs? teachers laid off? air traffic controllers and airport security, hardship on a lot of people. seep yours, middle class families scram to believe find child care for their kids. bad idea. a bad idea. >> the sequester was the administration's idea. in they were president obama's idea. >> the so-called "sequester" was obama's idea in the first place. he signed it in to law. >> white house lemede recommendd this. >> bret: conservative group crossroad gps launched that ad today, that video. before that you saw the president at the white house. answering president at appearance with the japanese prime minister. bring in our panel. fredbars, "weekly standard." juan williams, columnist with the hill. syndicated columnist charles krauthammer. fred, where d
that then goes out and stimulate the world economy like apollo and early space programs stimulated the economy of the world. i got an iphone on my hip that has 2000 times the memory of an apollo computer. can you imagine? the space station guys, they have texts, skype or something up there. and they're all on their laptops. it boggles your mind what is going on there technologically. >> today you could probably tweet what is going on on your flight. on your first and only flight, on the way back to earth, you got to do spacewalk. >> it was totally different. a different experience. as i described being on the moon, it contrasts the gray lunar surface with the blackness of space. people ask me what does the earth like from the moon? i said i cannot tell you because i landed in the center of the moon which took the earth directly overhead. in an apollo space suit, it is like being in a fishbowl. you move your head but the helmut does not move. so i did not get to see the earth very much from the moon. but in lunar orbit, you come around from the backside and there is the earth rise. we landed at
roofers and home inspector and is then that has a booying fantastic on the overall economy having said that i'm not living with my head in the sand here i recognize that a lot of markets are still suffering a little bit and this graph show you's you the change of value in home price from their local market peak to where they are at present the case sowler composite and san francisco is halfway through the pack there down to about 33% and so whole values are still off from where they were before but if you look at where we are from the low point until where we are today, san francisco is looking a little bit better and oakland is not a member city and they randomly take 20 cities that are plead broadly representative of the housing market and san francisco is the second line on here and posted as one of the naysest paces of recovery and so we get some help from residential construction and we also get help from securelier spending this is what i'm showing here and this is the debt service ratio and it's an interesting concept if says if you add up my mortgage payment and car payment and
again in that area, and then at some point getting towards the summer, if the economy continues to grow, this market is going to move a lot higher from there. i'm a buyer, still a buyer at these lofty levels. >> went through an entire hour without mentioning the "s" word that everybody hates in washington, sequestration, right? >> yes. >> that's coming up march 1st. soon after that a big jobs number coming up, and tomorrow live economic data. >> oh, yeah. >> that could move this market one way or another. >> as the economic data moves, it doesn't move it long term but short term. if the numbers don't come in where we want and the fed comes out with some statement tomorrow afternoon looking to maybe curtail that buying program. there's a lot of things that come out, but i still think they will be short-term moves. >> the market will ignore the bad news and embrace the good news. how cool is clive davis? >> besides warren buffett the only other legend i would shake hands with on the trading floor. >> and we were all thrilled to do that. his book is called "the soundtrack of my life" out t
that depend on them, or would they rather put hundreds of thousands of jobs and our entire economy at risk just to protect a few special interest tax loopholes that benefit only the wealthiest americans and biggest corporations? that's the choice. are you willing to see a bunch of first responders lose their job because you want to protect some special interest tax loophole? are you willing to have teachers laid off or kids not have access to head start? or deeper cuts in student loan programs? just because you want to protect the special tax interest loophole that the vast majority of americans don't benefit from. that's the choice. that's the question. and this is not an abstraction. there are people whose livelihoods are at stake. there are communities that will be impacted in a negative way. i know that sometimes all this squabbling in washington seems very abstract. and in the abstract, people like the idea, you know, there must be some spending we can cut. there must be some waste out there. there absolutely is, but this isn't the right way to do it. so my door is open. i put cuts an
that trend and take one oracle -- 1-2% of our economy every year to convert to green energy, we would be much further ahead. i'm so tired of the republican party to always be anti-green. we have an issue on this planet. i would like to see some things done in regard to that. green energy is important, and we should pursue it. thank you so much. guest: nobody is saying that it is not important. what they are seeing is that the federal government does not need the department of energy -- it does not need to be putting money into loan programs for companies like solyndra and fiskar. others -- they have gone bankrupt the. have gotten hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars for loan programs and all of those companies that got those loans with that taunt of money have gone bankrupt. something is wrong with the vetting process and something is wrong with technology that it is not working in the marketplace. i had solar panels on my house in tennessee as a test keys thursday as a test case 30 + years ago. they're looking to see if we could get enough heat units per day in solar panels. we never got
the importance of the other nine to five economy. the impact of all that you do has an impact on our job situation and local economy, and to highlight all of the great work that we can do together to ensure that the sectors that you all represent, the sectors that you work for, that you employ people for connaught is one of the greatest sectors in san francisco. i hope we will take the opportunity of the america's cup to showcase our clubs, our restaurants, our nightlife events. as someone who represents the broadaway neighborhood, an area of town that i used to spend a lot of time in when i was in my 20's -- but actually, very few locals take the time to head to the beach on broadway. our neighborhoods are coming together to say that broadway is open to the rest of the world as well as san francisco. i want to put san francisco back on the map when it comes to music. to make sure that we have the type of entertainment that we used to be renowned for. and those of you that work in our bars and clubs, i want to make sure that we are trading the kind of destinations that we look forward to
on the economy if it were to take place. >> there were others like howard dean suggesting the president should let the sequester happen. to slice the pentagon's budget. dean telling the huffington post i'm in favor of the sequester. it's tough on things i care about a lot but the fact of the matter is you are not going to get another chance to cut the defense budget in the way it needs to be cut. white house officials disagree. as an outgoing defense secretary leon panetta who warned such deep cuts could leave america with a second rate military. you will remember republicans were furious before the election that the white house did not follow the warren act that requires employers to warn employees about the potential lay-offs. since furlough notices are only going out now, defense officials say they work at the pentagon until late april. even if the sequest starts on march 1. at the white house, ed henry. fox news. >> bret: the pentagon's budget chief says the effects of the cuts will be felt nationwide. he says the biggest potential losses will be in california, texas, georgia and virginia.
in this economy. this is not a good thing. gerri: i want to take you back to something that you just said that i have heard before and i think is really interesting. you say obamacare will collapse under its own weight. how is that going to happen? >> well, i think that that tax burden is causing revolt. i think you're going to see a real problems with the implementation of this. states are having trouble putting these exchanges together other states are not going to do it. i think at every step of the way they are missing deadlines and the implementation. gerri: well, the compliance rate, i think it will be interesting to see you get someone in goes a long illness. you have been absolutely right. you know, we have been talking a lot about the different things that people have to do. h&r block and feels like they have to educate people on what they're going to end up paying because they realized that a lot of their customers who are low-income will end up losing there refunds because of it. there are so many unintended consequences. are you hearing from your constituents about this? are they ups
>> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to reverberate from coast to coast. >> now! ifill: as gun-control activists push for stricter laws. and gun owners chafe against the prospect of new regulation, crossing for... causing for now an increase in sale in firearms and attendance at gun shows. that dpebt is now spre
now, a tremor will hit the american economy that is both unwelcome and unnecessary. it is an across-the-board cut in spending that, according to some estimates, will cost us 750,000 american jobs. as we will hear today, there are some estimates that that is too conservative. if one takes into account the ripple effects of the tremor, it may cost us many more jobs than that, but even by the most conservative estimates, 750,000 americans who worked in contract in firms, research companies, universities, hospitals, child care centers, schools, businesses small and large around the country, and who work for the government itself, will find themselves and their country at risk. this does not need to happen. led by my friend and colleague from whom we will hear in a little while about the specifics, we put forward a constructive, common-since alternative to avoid these 750,000 layoffs. the alternative, frankly, involves closing tax loopholes that the wealthiest among us can exploit and take advantage of, and stopping mindless subsidies to huge oil companies and agribusinesses. it makes se
last year was. we're about probably 15 more units ahead in what we did last year. i can see the economy is coming back. >> they say that sales are typically brisk on presidents' day because of dealer discounts. a lot of car dealerships use the holiday to launch their spring lines. >>> on the heels of that warm spring-like weather we enjoyed over the weekend, winter has returned for the bay area. prepare yourself for cold and rain as you head out the door. up next. steve paulson is tracking the storm. >>> a very unique dog saves the day. how she was able to pull her owners to safety from a burning house. >>> we're looking at the seen of an injury clash was just cleared and did a little damage to the center divide there on northbound 280 in daly city. we'll tell you how the traffic is still unwinding and what you can do to get around it. mom, i invited justin over for lunch. good. no, not good. he's a vegetarian and he's going to be here in 20 minutes! [ mom ] don't stress. we can figure this out. ♪ [ male announcer ] get the speed to make a great first impression. call today to get u-v
, the strength of our economy, the strength of our moral example, after balance those things. this university has been educating and training people to understand that balance since its very beginning. i spoke this morning with a whole group of very talented young rotc students, many who are getting ready to graduate in commission on the three programs operating on the status. -- on this campus. the university has put 1079 people into the peace corps in its 51 year history. numerous people over the course of the university history have gone to work in the state department's. then we can go broader, teach for america, or the students who have trained over generations to get jag program degrees, military law degrees here. this university is so committed to that global role that we are supposed to play as citizens and to keeping those balances of strength and balance. there's really no one today on this stage in our country where exemplifies keeping those invalid better than our speaker. we're so glad to welcome here to the ground and to the commonwealth. please give a warm welcome to secretary john
we all lived when the floor fell out of the 2008 economy. that was the detroit represented by the three big auto manufacturers whose failure would have symbolized to many of us the very failure of america, and that detroit as the obama for america campaign reminded us repeatedly, is now very much alive and kicking. but that detroit, the detroit we all want to see survive, exists in the entire country, not within any specific municipal bounds. then there is the literal detroit, the one where people live, the renaissance city founded initially in 1701. once it was a hub for mechanical manufacturing and detroit in the mid 20th century was a magnet for those looking for work. the city's population grew to more than 1.8 million residents in the 1950s. today, according to the latest census, detroit is the only -- the country's 18th largest city with just more than 700,000 inhabitants, for a city that covers almost 139 square miles. a space that san francisco, boston and manhattan could fit in with room to spare. there are so many factors contributing to the city's financial distr
that will spur a new american economy that is focused again on making and innovating and growing and manufacturing and exporting. the long-term security and absolutely dependent on managing these risks we have identified today. it is that important for this country. you all can help. one man who understands this better than most is tom daschle. i can say a lot of things about tom daschle. i can talk about his military career in the air force. i can talk about his service in the house of representatives and his extraordinary leadership in the senate. the only person to serve as a majority and minority leader. i have said a lot about this man in terms of what his counterparts thought of him. i prefer to talk about tom daschle the father and grandfather. i think you can tell the measure of a man or a woman by the children. tom has got three great kids. i had the pleasure of knowing all of them. his daughter is an award- winning journalist. his son nathan is a social entrepreneur. his daughter lindsay, my favorite -- he cannot say that -- works at usda. she did an extraordinary job o
the economy and jobs. there is, obviously, debate how many jobs have been created in the economy. look. you pointed out to apple tim cook in the audience in the state of the union and sitting on over $171 million in cash at apple. why? because uncertainty in the marketplace. tom friedman writing this morning something that caught my eye. he said you can feel the economy wants to launch but washington is sitting on the national mute button. we the people feel like the children of permanently divorcing parents. >> how does this sequester business end? the president said during the campaign the sequester, the word for automatic spending cuts, he said it would not happen. is it going to happen? >> i always read tom friedman has the good minnesota sensibility. the column today i think is continuation of that. frankly i believe a continuation of exactly the plan the president laid out in detail in the state of the union on tuesday night. we have already made 2.5 trillion dollars in deficit reduction efforts. we are going to -- we're ready as the president said in a very detailed way to make anoth
, then when you achieve those economies of scale, then they are strictly price competitive in the marketplace. if you can allow, ma continue to march down that technology pathway, then we think that eventually you can see a scenario where you don't need them. we hope. you know, and i think we have seen that in our technologies. each of our technology pathways have an endpoint that is below the current prices of the income the technology they are competing with. i think you'd see sort of a natural exit point right there. >> thanks. i will take one last question. >> thanks. thanks very much for the conference. i have a question for kevin. unless i missed it, one of the priorities you did not mention was a clean energy standard, and that was a priority of previous committee chairman, and wondered why that wasn't one of the priorities of senator wyden. and if the answer is, it is no chance of passing the house, or it has no chance of passing the house -- i would be interested in hearing your thoughts on that and your thoughts on why energy standard is not a viable strategy no. >> sure. i think ac
with. >> he's not alone. >> our economy is adding jobs but too many people still can't find full-time employment. >> when president obama took office, 134 million americans were working in nonfarm jobs. today, after massive losses and a slow recovery, we're only 1.2 million jobs better off. and many pay less than those that were lost. recent study by the center for college affordability found almost half of college graduates are now in jobs that do not require four-year degrees. things like janitorial services, taxi driving and retail sales. professor richard vetter at ohio university helped author that study. >> let's say each one of them were making $20,000 a year more in income, which is quite plausible. we are talking about $400 billion a year in lost wages. >>> numbers like that made some economic analysts argue that underemployment may be every bit as damaging to the economy as unemployment. and kellock irvin is caught in the middle of it all. for now he takes freelance jobs as a photographer and part-time work with moving companies. but -- >> that can only support me so lo
.s. economy is not adding jobs, the claims for uninsurance benefits up pas past-- combined with continued worries about economic growth lead the major stroke averages lower within the s&p 500 off by 9.5. >> susie: stocks weren't the only investments falling today. many commodities also ended lower, on top of steep declines yesterday. u.s. oil futures fell to there lowest point this year, closing at $92.84 a barrel. so what's at the root of the commodities sell-off, and will it continue? erika miller reports. >> reporter: selling was heavy in crude oil today, as it was in most commodities. but crude also fell on new inventory data showing a big jump in oil supplies. >> today we had an inventory number which came out, which we were expecting a build of around two million barrels. we got a build of around four million barrels. >> reporter: across the room, gold futures were little changed. although industrial metals like platinum and palladium got slammed. grain prices also plunged, with wheat hitting an eight-month low today. the thomson reuters-jefferies c.r.b. index, a global commodities
economy will see back-to-back years of contraction for the first time. of course, now the focus turns to the weekend's italian elections. overnight in asia. shanghai is closing out its worst weekly loss in two years. nikkei managing to close higher. road map this morning starts with the markets. we' results from aig and upgrade for home depot helping stocks today, and hewlett-packard. >> hp is popping pre-market on the back of the earnings. sigh of relief for the investors as the company showed some progress with its turn-around. david will have the exclusive with meg whitman in just a few minutes. >> more signs of consumer trouble. nordstrom gives a weak outlook. darden revising lower its outlook for the year. >>> we start off with the markets. pointing to a big rally today as the market recovers from fears that the fed will halt its easing process sooner than expected. this after stocks post their biggest two-day drop of the year, closing at two and a half-week lows in the heaviest vim trading day in 2013. >> i feel that there were some calls yesterday on dennis garvin saying 100% c
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